The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust


Heart Failure Service


Heart Failure Service

Welcome to the Heart Failure Service

 We are a multi- disciplinary team aiming to provide and support an excellent service to Heart Failure patients across the city. We work closely with Primary Care GP services in Leeds.

Leeds GPs follow best practice NICE guidelines and refer patients in to a specialist diagnostic Multi-disciplinary Heart Failure service based at Leeds General Infirmary. The service is led by British Heart Foundation Professor Mark Kearney, Dr Klaus Witte, Dr Ric Cubbon, Dr Alex Simms, Dr Kate Gatenby and Professor Chris Gale.

Despite the complexity of the condition we can demonstrate delivery of high quality modern heart failure care working closely with heart failure specialist nurses and with improved survival of our patients.

 

COVID 19 Advice for Heart Failure patients 

We understand that this is a concerning time for you and your family, and that you will have many questions about COVID 19 and heart failure. However, we are anticipating significant demand on the NHS service and ask you to read the guidance below in the first instance.

General Advice

If you are concerned about coronavirus please look carefully at the NHS website https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/

Patients with heart failure should take precautions to avoid infection with COVID 19 by social distancing and avoid meeting or living with anyone who might have symptoms of COVID 19 infection https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-on-social-distancing-and-for-vulnerable-people/guidance-on-social-distancing-for-everyone-in-the-uk-and-protecting-older-people-and-vulnerable-adults from the onset of symptoms.

Please avoid visiting your GP surgery, pharmacy or hospital if you are managing your symptoms.

However, please use (or call if you cannot get online) NHS 111 online coronavirus service website https://111.nhs.uk/covid-19/ if:

  • You feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home
  • Your condition gets worse
  • Your symptoms do not get better after 7 days

If you need general advice about your heart failure please email:

leedsth-tr.heartfailureltht@nhs.net

If you have specific questions or concerns not answered by the following information or cannot be answered by email, please call 0113 3926420, Monday-Friday 08.00-16.00.

If you are under the care of the Community Heart Failure service please contact them in the usual way (0113 843 4200, Monday-Friday, 0830-16.30)

Please bear in mind that we will be extremely busy over the coming months and it may take some time to respond to you. Emails will be triaged depending on clinical urgency, please ensure you include: Name, NHS number and date of birth.

Heart Failure Treatment

If you feel well you don’t need to do anything differently, other than follow the NHS guidance on COVID 19.  

 

We do not know for certain which patients are at increased risk but it is sensible that patients with heart failure should take extra precautions. Regular hand washing with soap is extremely important. We would suggest giving extra consideration to minimising unnecessary travel and social contact.  Please follow any guidance given to you by the NHS specifically if you receive a letter advising 12 weeks isolation.

 

We highly recommend you continue all medications you are prescribed for your heart condition, unless you are told otherwise by a health care professional.

In particular, you should continue your ACE inhibitors (e.g. Ramipril) or ARBs (e.g. Candersartan) as there is no evidence that these medications cause harm in COVID 19. In fact, stopping these medications when not clinically indicated risks your heart failure worsening.  Please see position statement from the European Society of Cardiology (https://www.escardio.org/Councils/Council-on-Hypertension-(CHT)/News/position-statement-of-the-esc-council-on-hypertension-on-ace-inhibitors-and-ang).

Sick Day Rules

In some cases, for instance when you have a fever, it might be reasonable to stop or reduce your water tablets (diuretics) to prevent dehydration during the illness (sick day rule applies). You should make sure you drink water regularly (1.5 to 2.0L a day, unless you are told otherwise).  It is important to keep an eye on your weight daily or for evidence of swelling (oedema) in your legs/stomach/sacrum as well as your urine output.  Adjusting diuretics up and down is safe to do so as long as you watch your fluid balance (daily weights or swelling) and you have enough supply of tablets.

 

 

Contact us

Heart Failure Nurse Specialists
Telephone: 0113 3926420
Fax: 0113 3922264

Sarah Winsor
s.winsor@nhs.net

Emma Sunley
emma.sunley@nhs.net

Research Nurses
Telephone: 0113 3923131